Meet some of the UIC MCHP students…

Amanda BennettAmanda Bennett
PhD student in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Epidemiology

I chose UIC because: The MCH epidemiology program is nationally renowned for its strong focus on applied epidemiology.  They emphasize both a strong methodological/research base and a focus on making research applicable to real-life public health practice.

Job before coming to UIC: CSTE/CDC Applied Epidemiology Fellow at the Illinois Department of Human Services (2 year fellowship)

Organizations you are involved with (on or off campus): I am a volunteer leader for the Jr. and Sr. high youth group at my church in Evanston.

What’s next: Working on my dissertation so I can graduate!  I hope to find a job in a state health department as an MCH epidemiologist when I am done with my PhD.

Favorite Chicago spot(s): I love pizza in general, and Lou Malnati’s has my favorite Chicago-style pizza.

 

 

TalTalia Salzmania Salzman
MPH student in Maternal and Child Health

I chose UIC because: UIC has one of the most recognized MCH programs in America!

Job before coming to UIC: Undergraduate student at the University of British Columbia

Organizations you are involved with (on or off campus): MSAPH, Hillel

What’s next: Medical School! (fingers crossed)

One fun or interesting fact about you: I like to play jazz blues on the piano and compose music occasionally.

Favorite Chicago spot(s): Nacional 27- best salsa dance club.

 

 

Tamara KozyckyjTamara Kozyckyj
MPH student in Maternal and Child Health and Global Health 

I chose UIC because: Not only was the MPH program appealing with prestigious faculty members, known research and extensive network, but also the appeal of in-state tuition. In addition, Chicago is a city full of opportunities to learn more about global health and attend lectures/conferences and through UIC’s network I would have the chance to engage in these opportunities.

What’s next: Looking for a job that I can be passionate about.

One fun or interesting fact about your: Three days following my college graduation, I road tripped to Yosemite National Park with 3 friends for a week of hiking and breathtaking views before our summer jobs/commitments began. Eager to get there, we drove 36 hours (practically) non-stop from Chicago to our destination!

Favorite Chicago spot(s): Tecalitlan Mexican Restaurant (cheap, delicious, and awesome margaritas), Alliance Bakery (great little study nook), the theater district.

 

 

Yuka AsadaYuka Asada
PhD student in Maternal and Child Health

I chose UIC: because of my advisor and the interesting research projects.

Job before coming to UIC: Clinical Dietitian in Vancouver, Canada

Organizations you are involved with (on or off campus): Critical Dietetics, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

What’s next: World domination. Or, more likely, graduate and seek employment.

One fun or interesting fact about yourself: My father is a pastry chef and I am his apprentice.

Favorite Chicago spot(s): Green City Market

 

 

 

 

Save the Children Event at UIC: Uniting for Maternal and Child Health

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Maternal and Child Health Program (MCHP) partnered with Save the Children, UIC’s Global Health Initiative, The University of Chicago’s Global Health Initiative, and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine’s Center for Global Health to host a seminar at UIC on October 14th.  This was part of a three part lecture series where each university hosted an event that addressed various topics related to maternal and child health.

The keynote speaker was Steven Wall, MD, MPH, MSW, Senior Advisor, Save the Children, who discussed a report that was recently released by Save the Children entitled, “Surviving the First Day: State of the World’s Mothers 2013”.

Then the seminar focused on connecting the global to the local, and there were brief presentations by the following stakeholders:

  • Brenda Jones, DHSc, MSN, APN-BC, Deputy Director, Office of Women’s Health, Illinois Department of Public Health
  • Janine Lewis, MPH, Executive Director, EverThrive Illinois
  • Rosemary White Traut, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, Department of Women, Children and Family Health Science, UIC College of Nursing

The MCHP would like thank all our partners for such a great event!  It was a pleasure working with all of you and we look forward to working with you in the future!

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IAIMH Dolores Norton Student Research Award

Illinois Association for Infant Mental Health (IAIMH)
2013 Dolores Norton Student Research Award

This award is presented each year to recognize a promising doctoral student or post-doctoral scholar in the field of infant and toddler social-emotional health, development, and intervention.  The award honors Dolores Norton, known to most as “Dodie,” who is the Samuel Deutsch Professor Emerita at the School of Social Service Administration of the University of Chicago.  Professor Norton has been an extraordinary mentor to a generation of graduate students who learned from her the importance of early child development, the roles of community and culture in early child development, the principles of family support practice, and the ways research can inform practice.  Dr. Norton devoted her research career to understanding children and families living in conditions of poverty and to understanding children and families through the complex lens of an ecological systems framework.

The award provides a $5,000 stipend to support research on an open topic regarding 1) social-emotional development or mental health during the zero to five age period, 2) behaviors, beliefs, and mental health of expectant parents or parents of young children, and/or 3) interventions for infants, young children, or families.   The award is open to doctoral students or postdoctoral fellows enrolled in or affiliated with an educational or research institution in Illinois. Area of discipline is open.

Applications will be reviewed by the Illinois Association for Infant Mental Health Research Committee.  The recipient will be chosen based on the quality of the study proposed and the potential for contribution to the scholarly literature and to practice.  The award will be presented on October 25 at the ILAIMH annual meeting (awardees will be notified in advance, and will be given complimentary registration for the meeting, as well as a year’s membership in ILAIMH).  Awardees will be expected to present a progress report after one year that indicates how they used the funds and the progress of their proposed project. Awardees are also expected to present on their project to the ILAIMH membership, either as a research poster at the 2014 annual meeting, or in a brief report in the ILAIMH newsletter.

Application deadline:  September 1, 2013

Application Guidelines:
Submit via e-mail (in MSWord or PDF) a brief narrative description (1500 words or less) of the proposed research project. The narrative should address the following questions:
1. What questions is the study attempting to address?
2. What are the core research methods being used?
3. In what way will the research provide a better understanding of the socioemotional development or mental health of children or the behavior or mental health of their parents in the birth to five period? What is unique or innovative about the proposed research?
4. What are the potential implications for the research for practice or in applied settings?
5. What faculty members are mentors for this research project?  Is the study a dissertation project?  Has the dissertation proposal already been approved by a faculty committee?
6. What is the timeline for completion of the project?  How much of the work has already been done, and how much remains to be accomplished during the period of the award?
7. Does the project have appropriate IRB approval?
8. How will the funds from the award be used? How, specifically, would the funding assist in the completion of the project? The funds may be used to fund all or a portion of the proposed project, such as research materials, software, training on research methods, payments to research study participants.  The funds may not be used to pay for student living expenses or conference travel.

Submit applications to Jon Korfmacher at jkorfmacher@erikson.edu

The awardee will be notified by October 1.

An announcement and presentation of the award will be made at the ILAIMH annual meeting on Friday, October 25, 2013. Questions about the award may be directed to Jon Korfmacher, Co-chair of the ILAIMH Research Committee at jkorfmacher@erikson.edu or 312-893-7133.

 

 

MCH Seminar–Shattering Families: How Mass Incarceration Harms Parents and Children

On March 12, 2013, the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Training program at University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) hosted the seminar “Shattering Families: How Mass Incarceration Harms Parents and Children.” This seminar featured two speakers: Gail Smith, Senior Policy Director at Chicago Legal Advocacy for Incarcerated Mothers (CLAIM), and a Visible Voices speaker. Visible Voices is a group composed of formerly incarcerated women who speak out and share their experiences with others. A diverse crowd of individuals from within and beyond the UIC School of Public Health assembled to hear these two speakers discuss issues related to the mass incarceration of all women and, in particular, of mothers.

Ms. Smith presented information on the scale of this issue, outlining the dramatic rise of incarceration in the United States over the past 40 years and how rates in this country are much higher than those in other developed nations. The female prison population grew by 832% between 1977 and 2007. About 80% of these women are incarcerated for non-violent offenses, and 80-85% of all incarcerated women are mothers. Ms. Smith outlined how this leads to several unique issues for the children of these women. For example, if a mother is her child’s sole caregiver, the child will be transitioned into the care of another family member or the foster care system. The latter is of particular concern since the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 allows for termination of parental rights if any child is in foster care for 15 of the 22 previous months. She then discussed how everyone impacted by the criminal justice system would benefit from a restorative justice approach, which focuses on healing rather than punishing. The Visible Voices speaker then put a face to all of these statistics as she shared a powerful, personal account of her experiences with the criminal justice system and how her incarceration directly impacted her sons.

For more information on this issue and to learn how to become involved, please visit CLAIM’s website: http://www.claim-il.org/.

 

This blog entry was written by MCHP student, Nicole Gonzalez who also organized this event.

 

 

“We are MCH”: Presentations about Maternal and Child Health

 Learn about the MCH field, our legacy, and the positive impact we have had on the health and well being of women, children and families.

 

The University of South Florida coordinated efforts with the Maternal and Child Health Training Programs to create Prezi presentations entitled “We Are MCH”.  Several MCH training programs (including our program) submitted pictures and quotes that were included in these presentations. The hope is to raise awareness about the field of MCH and the great work that is being done.

 

Click on the following links to view the presentations:
http://prezi.com/rz0qkn_wwzvp/we-are-mch/
http://prezi.com/c7e6u6hpyk2u/we-are-mch-mini-1/
http://prezi.com/wc9jvevjv3nz/we-are-mch-mini-2/
http://prezi.com/kyjdfgl9b17o/we-are-mch-mini-3/

 

 

Want to Know More About MCH?

The students in the University of Washington Maternal and Child Health
(MCH) Program and in other MCH schools of public health training
programs nationwide created a visual narrative of the public health work
and research they are doing in their communities. The presentation was done with the help of Charlotte Noble and the University of South Florida MCH Program.

You can view the presentation here.  If you are interested in engaging in work that improves the health and well-being of women, men, children, and families then you will enjoy this presentation – it may even give you ideas about how you can make a difference!

The stories help illustrate how MCH makes a difference in the lives of
women and children.

UIC Management Skills Series: March 2013-Feburary 2014

Program Description:
Management Skills Series is a professional development initiative designed to strengthen the participant’s basic and intermediate level management skills. The curriculum encompasses 12 topics offered on a monthly basis for three hours in person at the UIC School of Public Health.  Sessions can be taken on a stand-alone basis or as a certificate program.

Sessions will be offered in a workshop format and include an information-packed overview of the workshop topic as well as participatory learning activities such as case studies, role-playing, and group discussion. Participants will have the opportunity to build their knowledge base on management practices, policies and principles, sharpen comprehension of complex topics, and practice ways to apply new knowledge as a manager in a public health setting.

Workshops:

Foundations of Managing an Organization
03/15/2013    Introduction to Management Principles
04/19/2013    Vision, Mission, and Strategic Planning
05/17/2013    Building an Effective Board of Directors/Advisory Board

Increasing Your Management Effectiveness
06/21/2013    Understanding Communication Styles
07/19/2013    Building and Motivating Teams
08/16/2013    Conflict Resolution
09/20/2013    Overcoming Burnout

Managing Operations      
10/18/2013    Planning and Managing a Sustainable Budget
11/15/2013    Project Management
12/13/2013    Continuous Quality Improvement

Managing the 21st Century Organization  
01/17/2014    Increasing Impact through Collaboration and Partnerships
02/21/2014    Using Social Media for Marketing and Advocacy

** All the sessions are from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm**

Cost:
$450 for all 12
$50 for each session

Click here for session descriptions and to register (Note: There are three tabs at the top of the page to choose from, click on the tab to view the information you would like to see)

Scholarship Eligibility—MCHP Alumni:
Scholarships will cover the cost of all 12 sessions. We will be giving out 2 scholarships to MCH/MCHP EPI alumni. In order to qualify for the scholarships you must be an alumna of the Maternal and Child Health Program or the Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program.  Ideal candidates would have 2-4 years of work experience and be able to attend all 12 workshops.

Application Requirements:
Please submit your resume and a short statement describing your interest in the program.

Please address the following questions:
1) Why do you want to participate in this program?  2) What goal(s) are you hoping to achieve through this program?

Please email your resume and your statement to Jaime Klaus, MA, at jaimkl@uic.edu by February 18, 2013.  You will be notified if you received the scholarship by February 20, 2013.

Thank you for the interest in the program!

Please note: Continuing education units (CEU’s) are not available for this program Participants will receive a certificate of completion if they sign up for all 12 courses. However, he/she is absent for more than 3 workshops out of the 12 he/she will not receive the certificate.

 

 

Sponsored by:  MidAmerica Public Health Training Center, Great Cities Institute at UIC, and Maternal and Child Health Program.

 

 

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